The Monday Rewind: New Album Releases 5-13-16

Every Monday, Ghettoblaster is looking back to new albums released the previous week.  Below you’ll find several albums released on Friday May 13th that we believe are definitely worth a listen.

Twin Peaks – Down in Heaven (Grand Jury)


Twin Peaks’ new album Down in Heaven is the type of album that is steeped in various influences, yet wholly original. The overall sound is classic rock mixed with elements of jangly country all with the DIY spirit Twin Peaks has had since their inception. There are ballads, straight up rockers and various other turns over the course of the 12 tracks, resulting in an endlessly entertaining and unique album.  There are shades of The Rolling Stones, The Kinks and T. Rex throughout. Twin Peaks member Caiden James describes the direction for the new album in the following way: “We wanted to make a record that employed the restraints of our favorite artists from yesteryear. It was about trying to simplify and hone in on the things that are important to our music and ethos.” This direction and the resulting album are extremely successful and definitely worth listening to.


Modern Baseball – Holy Ghost (Run for Cover Records)


Modern Baseball’s Holy Ghost is an incredibly solid pop-punk/emo album with a ton of heart. Jacob Ewald and Brendan Lukens share songwriting duties, with the first six songs being written by Ewald and the last five by Lukens. These songs cover a wide emotional range, from the highs and lows of touring life to heartbreak and personal struggle. Holy Ghost is a thematically heavy and mature album, but it is also a lot of fun to listen to, filled with catchy and hard rocking songs and clocking in under 30 minutes. Holy Ghost culminates in “Just Another Face,” which is a truly emotional song about struggling with depression and how some supportive words can be lifesaving. On the chorus Lukens channels one of these supportive voices singing “I’m not just another face, I’m not just another name, even if you can’t see it now,” which illustrates just how much the band has matured over the past two years.  This is the type of album from a young band that shows growth but also points to what exciting things could come next from them.


 

Eagulls – Ullages (Partisan Records)


Ullages, the sophomore album from Eagulls, feels like a lost gem from the 1980s that has just recently been uncovered. Sonically it is right in line with The Cure and Echo and the Bunnymen, without ever feeling like copycat music. On their first album Eagulls were catchier and even had some danceable elements. Ullages, on the other hand, is more of a slow burn of an album, content with plodding along at its own pace and revealing itself over time. It is a bit of a dour and tough listen, but there’s something to be said about Eagulls commitment to making an incredibly cohesive and unified album. Listeners who are able to embrace the gloom of Ullages will find themselves rewarded with a truly remarkable album.


 

Oscar – Cut and Paste (Wichita Recordings)


The true gift of Oscar’s music is found simply in his voice. He sings in a beautiful baritone with interesting melodies bringing to mind Stephen Merritt of The Magnetic Fields and occasionally Morrisey.  Oscar also produced all of the songs on Cut and Paste himself mainly in his own home, drawing on musical influences from all over the map, yet still within the pop-song framework.  The perfect example of what makes Oscar so special can be found in the very poppy, guitar heavy song “Sometimes,” which features an explosively catchy chorus and super fun music video as well. Cut and Paste is a wonderful spring-time album that will put a smile on your face and keep your head bobbing.

 

 

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