Tag Archive: “Merge Records”

The One About How Womyn Rock

On this episode of Best Song Ever, recorded on the day of the worldwide Women’s Marches in protest to Donald Trump’s inauguration, Luke and Brian protest in the form of podcasting (protcast? protestcast?) and dedicate the episode to songs from women/women fronted bands.  They discuss how they’ve hunkered down in the bunker of the Doom Tomb and are stocking provisions to get through the next four years and Luke goes on a bit of a rant, ultimately pointing out how ridiculous Reince Priebus’ name is.  Other topics of conversation include Dr. Robotnik, Band and Boujee and how we really how women don’t spontaneously combust.

Every week Ghettoblaster feature writers (and dear cousins!) Brian LaBenne and Luke LaBenne bring you fresh new songs with the hopes of introducing you to some that you may consider to be the best song ever.  Both Brian and Luke have no idea what songs the other has picked, so what you are hearing is their genuine reaction to listening to the songs together.  Also, if you enjoy this episode, head to ITunes to subscribe and rate our podcast with the highest rating available to you.

ITUNES LINK


Songs Played on The One About How Womyn Rock

The Courtneys – “Tour” from The Courtneys II out February 17th on Flying Nun Records

The Regrettes – “A Living Human Girl” from their debut album Feel Your Feeling Fool! out now on Warner Bros. Recrods

UV-TV – “Only Matters When” from their debut full length album Glass out March 10th on Deranged Records

Mai Lan – “Vampire” from her upcoming album due in 2017

Allison Crutchfield – “Dean’s Room” from Tourist in This Town out January 27th on Merge Records

Rebel Kind – “Just for Fools” from Just for Fools out now on Urinal Cake Records

Diet Cig – “Tummy Ache” from Swear I’m Good At This out April 7th on Frenchkiss Records

Dude York – “Tonight” from Sincerely out February 24th on Hardly Art Records

Acclaimed indie rocker Karl Hendricks passed away Saturday morning, and as his friend Jon of the Comedy Minus One label stated, “wearing a Funkadelic t-shirt, at home with his terrific wife and children in Pittsburgh.” Karl was best known for his Karl Hendricks Trio releases throughout the years, over 25 years of work, culminating  into a total of 9 albums. His recorded works would appear on Grass Records, Merge, and the aforementioned Comedy Minus One. In 2011 Hendricks took a leap of faith purchasing a record store he was working at and rechristened it Sound Cat.

Hendricks was diagnosed with cancer in 2014. We’ll remember Karl Hendricks through his timeless music.

 

Since the year 2000, Ghettoblaster has been putting out a quarterly print magazine.  For Ghettoblast from the Past, we look back at the bands and artists that were showcased within these pages.

From Issue 39, Cult Records The Growlers.  Words by Tommy Johnson.

Also From Issue 39, Merge Records Hiss Golden Messenger.  Words by Leo Deluca.

Growlers-Messenger

To subscribe to Ghettoblaster Magazine or to pick up this issue, head over to our In Print page.

 

The One With Awkward Boys and Punk Girls

This week on Best Song Ever Luke and Brian kick 2017 off in style with a song about dreading the upcoming year.  They talk about channeling your inner Julia Stiles, the Kirk Cameron classic film “Fireproof,” engage in another episode of Thor Talk and also introduce Tech Talk.  Of course, the music is always great and this episode may feature the strongest batch of songs yet.

Every week Ghettoblaster feature writers (and dear cousins!) Brian LaBenne and Luke LaBenne bring you fresh new songs with the hopes of introducing you to some that you may consider to be the best song ever.  Both Brian and Luke have no idea what songs the other has picked, so what you are hearing is their genuine reaction to listening to the songs together.  Also, if you enjoy this episode, head to ITunes to subscribe and rate our podcast with the highest rating available to you.

ITUNES LINK


Songs Played on The One With Awkward Boys and Punk Girls

Mac McCaughan – “Happy New Year (Prince Can’t Die Again)” available for download at Mac’s bandcamp

Stef Chura – “Spotted Gold” off of her debut album Messes out January 27th on Urinal Cake Records

Nnamdi Ogbonnaya – “let gO Of my egO” from Drool out March 3rd from Sooper Records and Father/Daughter Records

WHY? – “This Ole King” from their forthcoming sixth album Moh Lhean out March 3rd on Joyful Noise Recordings

Elliott Smith – “I Figured You Out” from Either/Or Expanded Edition out March 10th on Kill Rock Stars

Pinegrove – “Aphasia” from Cardinal out now on Run for Cover Records

P.O.S. – “Wearing a Bear” from Chill, dummy out January 27th on Doomtree Records

Clap Your Heads Say Yeah – “Fireproof” from The Tourist out February 24th

The One About the Best of 2016

Brian and Luke take you on a journey through some of their favorite albums of 2016.   Also, be sure to check out their individual top 20 albums of the year list on the Ghettoblaster Magazine website!

Every week Ghettoblaster feature writers (and dear cousins!) Brian LaBenne and Luke LaBenne will be bringing you fresh new songs with the hopes of introducing you to some that you may consider to be the best song ever.  Both Brian and Luke have no idea what songs the other has picked, so what you are hearing is their genuine reaction to listening to the songs together.  Also, if you enjoy this episode, head to ITunes to subscribe and rate our podcast with the highest rating available to you.

ITUNES LINK


Songs Played on The One About the Best of 2016

Outer Spaces – “Words” from A Shedding Snake on Don Giovanni Records

AJJ – “Cody’s Theme” from The Bible 2 on Side One Dummy Records

DOGBRETH – “Do You Really Want Me” from Second Home on Asian Man Records

Lambchop – “Relatives #2” from FLOTUS on Merge Records

Twin Peaks – “Getting Better” from Down in Heaven on Grand Jury Music

Mutual Benefit – “Not for Nothing” from Skip a Sinking Stone on Mom+Pop

PUP – “Doubts” from The Dream is Over on Side One Dummy Records

Frightened Rabbit – “I Wish I Was Sober” from Painting of a Panic Attack on Atlantic Records

Eric Bachmann – “Carolina” from Eric Bachmann on Merge Records

Kishi Bashi – “Honeybody” from Sonderlust on Joyful Noise Recordings

The One With Thor Talk

Every week Ghettoblaster feature writers (and dear cousins!) Brian LaBenne and Luke LaBenne will be bringing you fresh new songs with the hopes of introducing you to some that you may consider to be the best song ever.  Both Brian and Luke have no idea what songs the other has picked, so what you are hearing is their genuine reaction to listening to the songs together.  Also, if you enjoy this episode, head to ITunes to subscribe and rate our podcast with the highest rating available to you.

ITUNES LINK


Songs Played on The One With Thor Talk

Angel Haze – “Resurrection” from her upcoming sophomore album due in 2017

Wild Pink – “Great Apes” from their debut self-titled LP out February 10th on Tiny Engines

Hurray for the Riff Raff – “Rican Beach from The Navigator out March 10th on ATO Records

Uniform – “Tabloid” from Wake in Fright out January 20th on Sacred Bones

James Supercave – “Esther Reed” out now on Fairfax Recordings

Tim Darcy – “Tall Glass of Water” from Saturday Night out February 17th  on Jagjaguwar

The Clean – “Stars” from the 15th anniversary deluxe remastered version of their 2001 album Getaway out now on Merge Records

Louise Burns – “Who’s the Madman” from Young Mopes out February 3rd  on Light Organ

Since the year 2000, Ghettoblaster has been putting out a quarterly print magazine.  For Ghettoblast from the Past, we look back at the bands and artists that were showcased within these pages.

From Issue 44, Merge Records William Tyler.  Words by Luke LaBenne.

Also from Issue 44, Canvasback Records Adia Victoria.  Words by Tommy Johnson.

william-tyler

To subscribe to Ghettoblaster Magazine or to pick up this issue, head over to our In Print page.

This is Past Sounds. Every Friday Ghettoblaster Magazine is looking back and finding great music from various eras. This week we present some of the best music videos for great songs because, why not?  Below are songs and videos that sound and look great no matter what decade they’re played in. So strap in as we take a musical journey, back in time.

The Avalanches – Frontier Psychiatrist (Since I Left You, Sire Records) 2000


In 2000 The Avalanches released Since I Left You, an absolutely classic album with just around an hour of sample based summery dance music. It’s the type of album you really have to listen to from start to finish in a single sitting as the songs bleed together, providing an astounding DJ set.  Frontier Psychiatrist is not the best song on the album by any means, but the song, and even more so it’s music video, are a very good representation of what the album is all about: manic joy.  This is my favorite music video ever and it is utter chaos.  Looking for a grandma drummer?  How about a turtle with the face of your grandfather?  There are awesome looking horns, a strange parrot and so much more all on a single stage.  It simply is the best.


Robyn – Call Your Girlfriend (Body Talk, Konichiwa Records) 2010


Robyn took the indie pop world by storm in 2010, releasing three mini-albums and a full length collection of the best songs from these as well as some new songs. Everything she put out that year was fantastic and she has since become a staple for Hipster dance parties around the globe.  Call Your Girlfriend is a powerhouse pop song with a stellar music video.  The music for Call Your Girlfriend repeats itself, as do the lyrics, growing bigger and bigger each time until it culminates into an outright synth meltdown.  Likewise, the music video begins in a simple open warehouse with Robyn singing to the camera and dancing; however, over time the landscape changes a bit with great lighting and more involved dancing from Robyn.  The most impressive part of the video is that it is a single long tracking shot and Robyn nails the choreography the whole way through, making the video a visual delight.


Cut Copy – Need You Now (Zonoscope, Modular Recordings) 2011


Cut Copy is not necessarily a stuffy band but they had commanded a sort of stoic presence, especially during their live shows. Need You Now is the opening track on their great 2011 album Zonoscope and really set things off in the right direction.  It’s a fantastic driving song with a solid beat and shimmering synths in the same vein as New Order.  It’s not a playful song and Cut Copy had not been known as a playful band, which is what makes the music video for Need You Now so much fun.  It begins pretty normally with the band performing their song, but various athletes from several different sports show up and are captured on video in full gear, which is edited in a very cheesy and funny way.  Soon they are exchanging equipment, rushing the band’s playing area and eventually declaring love and war on one another.  It’s super fun and the fact that it came from Cut Copy makes it even better.


Lambchop – Gone Tomorrow (Mr. M, Merge Records) 2012


Gone Tomorrow is the opening track from the gorgeous album Mr. M, which was released by Lambchop, a band whose label describes them as “Nashville’s most f*cked up country band.” There’s nothing on this song that really points to their more sinister side, it is just a simply beautiful track.  Yet, that statement from the label does shed some light onto why the video for this slow, lovely song is full of local professional wrestling.  The pacing of the video matches the song and is a meditative and deliberate piece of art that captures wrestling moves the way you would capture ballerinas at a Julliard performance.  The combination of song, subject matter and video aesthetic is absolutely perfect, resulting in a seven minute video that leaves you wanting more.

Since the year 2000, Ghettoblaster has been putting out a quarterly print magazine.  For Ghettoblast from the Past, we look back at the bands and artists that were showcased within these pages.

From Issue 25, Merge Records Teenage Fanclub.  Words by Tom Schmidlin.

Teenage Fanclub

To subscribe to Ghettoblaster Magazine or to pick up this issue, head over to our In Print page.

 

This is Past Sounds. Every Friday Ghettoblaster Magazine is looking back and finding great music from various eras. Below are songs that sound great no matter what decade they’re played in. So strap in as we take a musical journey, back in time.

The Chills – Pink Frost (Kaleidoscope World, Flying Nun) 1986


The Chills stand out even amongst the stand out bands of the awesome wave of music from Australia and New Zealand in the 1980s. Flying Nun will live in infamy for producing some of the best jangle pop records and Kaleidoscope World is definitely no exception.  Pink Frost is unique both as a song from The Chills and as being released during this jangle pop era.  It begins with a very upbeat guitar riff but soon descends into minimalistic guitar and rhythm section in a much more somber tone.  The lyrics that follow are chilling, sung with a hazy delivery.  Pink Frost results in an uneasy, yet beautiful and fascinating journey for the listener.


The dB’s – Black and White (Stands for Decibels, Capitol Records) 1981

Stands for Decibels was the debut album for The dB’s and is truly a bizarre album.  It almost provides a bridge between 60’s psychedelic pop, 70’s power pop and 80’s new wave all at once.  Black and White stands as one of the best examples of their power pop leanings.  There are shades of punk, 60’s pop and psychedelic music throughout this powerhouse of a song.  An easy to follow and hum-along-to guitar riff propels the song forward as The dB’s sing about love and the loss of it.  There are interesting diversions with the guitar work, but what really shines here are the drums.  As the song goes on the drums get more and more frenetic, ultimately blasting apart by the end of the song.  This is a great one to test your speakers on and just blast away.


The Magnetic Fields – The Book of Love (69 Love Songs, Merge Records) 1999

Full disclosure: my wife and I are celebrating our 10th wedding anniversary soon and this is our song, so I had to post about it.  Stephen Merritt is the beautiful, droll, monotone and expressive vocalist behind The Magnetic Fields and puts together some of the most interesting melodies sung in a truly original voice.  Merritt is also a fantastic lyricist and The Book of Love is a wonderful example of what makes The Magnetic Fields so special.  The lyrics focus on, surprise surprise, the titular book that is huge and full of figures and documents the origin of music and how to love another person.  This really is such a special song that could have not been made by anyone else but The Magnetic Fields.


A Tribe Called Quest – Check the Rhime (The Low End Theory, Zomba Recording LLC) 1991

A Tribe Called Quest is revered as one of the best jazz infused hip-hop groups. Q-Tip, Ali Shaheed Muhammed and Phife burst on the scene in 1991 with their classic album The Low End Theory. This was the first step in an output that would prove them to be an incredibly influential crew.  Their music was in direct contradiction to the gangsta rap of the 90s and largely found them rapping about how cool, calm and collected they are.  “Here’s a funky introduction of how nice I am / Tell your mother, tell your father send a telegram” is a line that shouldn’t necessarily work in a hip-hop song but A Tribe Called Quest made a career out of expressing sentiments such as these over and over again in better and better ways.  Check the Rhime also features one of the best horn samples ever; so treat your ears to some really special music.