Tag Archive: “Jens Lekman”

The One With Great Storytellers

On this episode of Best Song Ever, Brian introduces a new segment that allows him to get some things off of his chest, Luke and Brian discuss whether or not nerds need to know more about sports, Luke defends shy white boys from Brian and Brian dips into the past and sings some N’Sync.  Also, there are eight incredible songs and some interesting discussions on hope and fear in politics and how music can bridge the gap between people who don’t see eye to eye.

Every week Ghettoblaster feature writers (and dear cousins!) Brian LaBenne and Luke LaBenne bring you fresh new songs with the hopes of introducing you to some that you may consider to be the best song ever.  Both Brian and Luke have no idea what songs the other has picked, so what you are hearing is their genuine reaction to listening to the songs together.  Also, if you enjoy this episode, head to ITunes to subscribe and rate our podcast with the highest rating available to you.

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Songs Played on The One With Great Storytellers

Jens Lekman – “What’s That Perfume That You Wear” from Life Will See You Now out February 17th on Secretly Canadian

Fred Thomas – “Mallwalkers” from Changer out January 27th on Polyvinyl Records

Craig Finn – “Preludes” from We All Want the Same Things out March 24th on Partisan Records

Austra – “Utopia” from Future Politics out January 20th on Domino Recording Company

Brandon Can’t Dance – “Smoke & Drive Around” from Graveyard of Good Times out now on Lucky Number Records

Porter Ray – “Sacred Geometry [Constellation Mix]” feat Palaceer, Shabazz Palaces and Cashtro from Watercolor out March 10th on Sub Pop Records

Tall Tall Trees – “Backroads” from Freedays out February 17th on Joyful Noise Recordings

Priests – “Nothing Feels Natural” from Nothing Feels Natural out January 27th on Sister Polygon Records

I Know What Love Isn’t

JENS LEKMAN
I KNOW WHAT LOVE ISN’T

“Every chord I struck was a miserable chord” pretty much sums up this entire record. Written on the tail end of a breakup, Lekman’s newest full length is the epitome of “sad bastard” music. I do give some credit because he at least claims he didn’t want to write about said breakup, but I guess he could’ve said that to gain some credibility. Regardless, the themes of heartache and loss are there, and set to music that teeters between The Smiths and Barry Manilow. It’s not necessarily bad; it’s just a bit too obvious, like he didn’t take too many risks to make it stand out from millions of other records that were made with the same formula. (Secretly Canadian) by Andrew Ryan Fetter