Tag Archive: “Faith No More”

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The term “supergroup” is thrown around a lot these days, though many of the bands adorned with this label don’t always live up to the hype. Dead Cross is not one of those bands.

Dead Cross is set to release their debut, eponymous album this Friday, August 4, 2017, as a joint release between labels Three One G, owned and operated by the band’s bassist, Justin Pearson, (The Locust, Retox), and Ipecac Recordings, owned and operated by the band’s bizarrely versatile vocalist, Mike Patton (Faith No More, Mr. Bungle, Fantômas). It’s a 28-minute banger of a hardcore album. Simply put, it’s a monstrously heavy and weird record, yet one that’s unpretentious and seemingly aware of its humble roots.

Dead Cross started in November, 2015, after a band called Philm featuring Dave Lombardo (Slayer, Fantômas) unexpectedly ended. Ross Robinson (At the Drive-In, Glassjaw, Slipknot), a renowned producer who was hip to Lombardo’s band-break-up-blues, was simultaneously conducting some recording sessions with Pearson and Michael Crain (Retox). With this perfect storm in place, things escalated rapidly; a band was formed, songs were recorded as they were simultaneously being written, and a debut live performance ensued less than a month later. Gabe Serbian (The Locust, Head Wound City) served as the band’s original vocalist, though stepped aside halfway through the recording process to be closer to his daughter. Patton, also a close friend and a former bandmate of Lombardo, enthusiastically accepted the band’s invitation to join as their new vocalist.

Justin Pearson gave a nod to his vocally inspired partner when we asked if there were any tracks on the record that stuck out to him the most. Here’s what he had to say:

“My favorite track on the album might be ‘Grave Slave’. I think Patton’s vocals, specifically his ‘witch voice’ rules and really makes this track for me.”

As soon as this track kicks in, you’ll likely know what Pearson is referencing. Patton fans will similarly rejoice in these spastically ferocious moments, accentuated with an abundance of deeply layered vocal harmonies and one of the most impressive tonal ranges in the business. Consistent with his unmistakable lyrical approach, Patton trudges his listeners through an onslaught of nightmarish imagery, pitch-black humor, and a disgusting amount of references to bodily fluid. Indeed, much of this album delivers a quintessential “Patton-esque” experience, though his performance maintains an impressive freshness throughout.

While the album demonstrates a limitless range in technical playing proficiency, there’s not a lot of over-thinking it here. Like many of Robinson’s past involvements, the album’s production is original, raw, and largely driven by visceral, gut-instinct. When asked what it was like working with Robinson, Justin Pearson told us the following:

“Working with Ross is rad. He is a brilliant man. But when I say that, I don’t just mean as far as him being a producer or even things pertaining to music. But just as a human, and his outlook on life, and more specifically his use of energy from the human spirit. That might seem a little new age-ish, but fuck it. The dude is on a whole other level with certain things in life.”

As you listen to the record, you may very well find yourself chuckling one moment at a bizarre lyrical phrase or a squirrely guitar riff, and then contemplate starting a riot the next. This is accomplished in a surprisingly linear fashion, especially considering the band’s roster. You aren’t going to hear a lot of genre shifting or even too many unusual time signature changes (do not approach this record expecting Mr. Bungle). Instead, you will hear a matured repertoire of finely crafted hardcore riffs between Pearson and Crain, some bone rattling blast beats and drum shredding by Lombardo, and one of the most haunting vocal performances by Patton to date.

This is also one of the most heretically charged albums on which Patton has ever performed. Songs like “Divine Filth,” featuring a delightfully macabre duet of sorts between Patton and Crain, and “Church of the Motherfuckers,” the album’s epic finale, make it pretty clear this album isn’t exactly geared for fundamentalists. And while this album certainly shouldn’t be categorized as a political record, there’s simply no denying the influence our past election cycle and our contemporary political climate had on shaping the album’s overall vibe. If any of this seems difficult to believe, you needn’t look any farther than the animated video for the album’s opener, “Seizure and Desist.”

As the core chaos from the aforementioned track settles, the audience is granted a roughly 40-second respite of atmospheric creepiness. You may want to take a few breaths at this point, as its one of the few low-key breaks you’re going to get. “Idiopathic” is on deck, and delivers an unrelenting attack, reminiscent of old-school east coast hardcore acts like Agnostic Front or Deep Wound.

The album inspiration is much farther reaching than just the east coast, however. Case in point, the album’s only cover song, “Bela Lugosi’s Dead” (originally written by England-based Bauhaus), proves the group’s genuine appreciation for punk’s many subgenres and forefathers all over the globe. It’s a chilling and driving rendition of the influential tune, only about a third as long as the original, and far away the deepest deviation from the album’s sonic motif.

The album will be available for purchase August 4, 2017. To promote the record, the band will be touring for the first time ever. Secret Chiefs 3, featuring Mike Patton’s former bandmate, Trey Spruance, will support most of upcoming dates as well. Check below for details. (Ipecac Recordings/Three One G) – Words by Andrew Humphrey

 

August 10 Santa Ana, CA  The Observatory *

August 11  Las Vegas, NV  Brooklyn Bowl

August 12  Phoenix, AZ  The Marquee *

August 14  Dallas, TX  Gas Monkey Bar & Grill

August 15  Houston, TX  Warehouse Live

August 16  Austin, TX  Emo’s

August 18  Tucson, AZ  The Rialto Theatre *

August 19  San Diego, CA  The Observatory North Park

August 21  Los Angeles, CA  El Rey Theatre

August 23  Berkeley, CA  The UC Theatre

August 25  Vancouver, BC  Vogue Theatre

August 26  Seattle, WA  The Showbox

August 27  Portland  Wonder Ballroom

August 29  Sacramento, CA  Ace of Spades

September 8  Baltimore, MD  Baltimore Soundstage

September 10  Philadelphia, PA  Union Transfer

September 11  Boston, MA  Royale

September 12  New York, NY  Gramercy Theatre

September 13  Brooklyn, NY  Warsaw

September 15  Detroit, MI  St. Andrew’s Hall

September 16  Chicago, IL  Riot Fest *

September 17  Milwaukee, WI  Turner Hall Ballroom

September 19  Minneapolis, MN  First Avenue

September 20  Lawrence, KS  Liberty Hall

September 23  Denver, CO  Ogden Theatre

* – Secret Chiefs 3 do not perform

Faith No More’s debut album We Care A Lot propelled the band into cult status back in 1985.  This was back when Chuck Mosely led the band (who was later replaced by Mike Patton) and burst through indie stations with the title track off the album. The group’s Introduce Yourself was released back in 1987 with a revamped version of the title track off the band’s debut. Now after 20 years out of print, We Care A Lot sees an Aug. 19 reissue via band member Bill Gould’s Koolarrow Records.

“This was an album that started as a demo, before any label had any interest in us,” explained Faith No More bass player Bill Gould. “There were a couple of reasons we decided to release this now: first of all, it’s been 20 years since it has been commercially available. Secondly, when cleaning out my basement, I discovered the original master reels, and we all thought that resurrecting this from the original tapes would be a great way to reintroduce We Care A Lot into the world. Lastly, this has been a band effort; we are releasing this in the same way as we recorded it, deciding everything amongst ourselves and getting our hands deep into the nuts and bolts… just like we used to.”

The original 10-song album, remastered by Maor Appelbaum via the original reels Gould eluded to, is enhanced with nine bonus tracks including demo versions (taken from the original 8-track tapes) of “Greed,” “Mark Bowen,” “Arabian Disco” and “Intro,” live versions of “The Jungle” and “New Beginnings” and new mixes, via Matt Wallace, of “We Care A Lot,” “Pills for Breakfast” and “As The Worm Turns.” Liner notes from keyboard player Roddy Bottum and behind-the-scenes photos will be included with the physical release.

FaithNoMore

We Care A Lot (Deluxe Band Edition) track list:
1. We Care A Lot
2. The Jungle
3. Mark Bowen
4. Jim
5. Why Do You Bother
6. Greed
7. Pills for Breakfast
8. As The Worm Turns
9. Arabian Disco
10. New Beginnings
11. We Care A Lot – 2016 Mix
12. Pills for Breakfast – 2016 Mix
13. As The Worm Turns – 2016 Mix
14. Greed – Original Demo
15. Mark Bowen – Original Demo
16. Arabian Disco – Original Demo
17. Intro – Original Demo
18. The Jungle – I-Beam, SF, 1986
19. New Beginnings – I-Beam, SF, 1986

Nevermen, the leaderless trio of Tunde Adebimpe (TV On The Radio), Adam “Doseone” Drucker (Anticon/cLOUDDEAD) and Mike Patton (Faith No More/Tomahawk) has set a Jan. 29 release date for their self-titled debut, Nevermen (North America: Ipecac Recordings; Internationally: Lex Records).

Pre-orders for the 10-song album are available now, with iTunes pre-orders  (https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/nevermen/id1051561235?ls=1&app=itunes) including an instant download of “Tough Towns” (https://soundcloud.com/nevermenmusic/nevermen-tough-towns), a song Rolling Stone described as “a quirky, cinematic avant-pop single” featuring “five minutes of eerie synthesizers and understated hip-hop beats.”  Nevermen physical pre-orders can be found here: https://merchaye-revolve.squarespace.com/ipecac-music/nevermen-nevermen-cd (CD) and https://merchaye-revolve.squarespace.com/ipecac-music/nevermen-nevermen-lp (vinyl).

Nevermen is neither side-project nor super group; it’s merely meant to be — a years-in-the-making partnership in which these men shared all duties, discovering their collective sound with the sort of glee and freedom usually reserved for first-timers. Amid this wild, weird churn of rock, pop, rap, soul, and other, it’s shockingly easy to lose track of who’s singing at what moment, and that’s the point: to quote Tunde/Adam/Mike in song, “The frontman digests its self.” Nevermen, the album, finds these three giants shredding their egos to get at the heart of why they do what they do, to explore the hopes and fears and wins and losses of anyone who carves career out of what started as dream.

 

Faith No More, who release Sol Invictus, their first new album in eighteen years, on May 18, will be live streaming their May 8 concert from Detroit via Yahoo! Live at 9:15 pm eastern:  https://bit.ly/1bQZvmu.

The show, which will be broadcast from The Fillmore, is one of the band’s first North American performances since 2010 and is part of a string of sold out dates by the Bay Area outfit.  Faith No More returns to North America in late July with a dozen additional dates including an August 5 performance at Madison Square Garden and a headlining spot at Heavy Montreal on August 8.  Bumbershoot recently announced Faith No More as one of the headliners of the venerable Seattle festival.

Sol Invictus will be streaming in its entirety via NPR on Monday, May 11, with Pandora giving listeners an early listen as of May 13.  Exclaim will be streaming the album for Canada. The band performs on The Tonight Show on May 13, with the late night TV appearance being Faith No More’s first since 1995.

Pre-order bundles, including limited edition vinyl, are available now via http://solinvictus.kungfustore.com in North America and http://faithnomore.firebrandstores.com in Europe.  Digital pre-orders, featuring instant downloads of “Motherf***er” and “Superhero” available here: http://geni.us/2L7x.

Catch them live here:

May 7     Chicago, IL     Concord Music Hall +

May 8    Detroit, MI     The Fillmore +

May 9     Toronto, ON     Sony Centre for the Performing Arts +

May 11     Boston, MA     Orpheum Theatre +

May 13     New York, NY     Webster Hall +

May 14     New York, NY     Webster Hall +

May 15     Philadelphia, PA     Electric Factory +

May 29     Gelsenkirchen, Germany     Rock Im Revier

May 31     Munich, Germany     Rockavaria Festival

June 2     Milan, Italy     Sonisphere

June 4     Vienna, Austria     Vienna Rocks Festival

June 5     Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic     Rock For People Festival

June 6     Berlin, Germany     Zitadelle Spandau

June 8     Krakow, Poland     Tauron Arena

June 10     Bratislava, Slovakia     Aegon Arena

June 12     Landgraaf, Netherlands     Pinkpop Festival

June 13     Donington, UK     Download Festival

June 14     Glasgow, UK     O2 Academy

June 17     London, UK     The Roundhouse

June 18     London, UK     The Roundhouse

June 20     Clisson, France     Hellfest

June 21     Dessel, Belgium     Graspop Festival

June 23     Hamburg, Germany     Sporthalle Hamburg

June 26    Norrkoping, Sweden     Bravalla Festival

June 27     Seinajoki, Finland     Provinssi

June 28     Odense, Denmark     Tinderbox

July 26     Austin, TX     Austin Music Hall

July 27     Dallas, TX     South Side Ballroom

July 28     Houston, TX     Bayou Music Center

July 30     Atlanta, GA     Masquerade Music Park ++

July 31     Raleigh, NC     Red Hat Amphitheater ++

August 1     Philadelphia, PA     Mann Center for the Performing Arts ++

August 2     Columbia, MD     Merriweather Post Pavilion ++

August 4     Boston, MA     Blue Hills Bank Pavilion ++

August 5     New York, NY     Madison Square Garden ++

August 7     Toronto, ON     Ricoh Coliseum ++

August 8   Montreal, QC     Heavy Montreal

 

September 6     Seattle, WA     Bumbershoot

September 18     Bogota, Columbia     Royal Center

September 24     Santana, Brazil     Anhembi Arena

September 25     Rio de Janeiro, Brazil     Rock in Rio

North American support:

+ – Le Butcherettes

++ – Refused

Faith No More, who reunited in 2009 for a series of sold-out performances and international festivals, is currently recording their first full-length album since 1997’s Album of the Year.

A limited edition (5000 copies) 7-inch single of the song “Motherfucker” will precede the April 2015 release, available via Record Store Day’s Black Friday event (Nov. 28).  The single will be released digitally on Dec. 9.

The as-of-yet untitled album is being recorded in an Oakland, Calif. studio with Gould handling production.  The release will be the first from Faith No More’s newly formed imprint, Reclamation Recordings, which will be distributed by Ipecac Recordings.

Prior to the new album’s release, Faith No More will headline Australia’s Soundwave Festival in February 2015.  Worldwide tour dates will be announced soon.

After a silence of over a decade, Jim Martin (formerly of Faith No More) agreed to a Q&A session with fans via a British based fan site. A set of 15 questions were selected by administrators of the fan site from over 500 submissions by fans eager to hear from Jim.

What follows is a Q&A session with Jim Martin: 

“Some weeks ago, the Faith No More “fan club guy” was asking about  how  to  contact me, he wanted to talk to me about the fan page.. After several exchanges via email, he and I decided to do a Q&A thing for the fans. My departure from FNM in 1993 was controversial; I left while the band was still at the peak of its success. I am proud of my contributions to the success and legacy of FNM. I appreciate the time and effort it took to put these questions together. Thank you for the opportunity,” said Jim Martin.

1.      Nefertiti Malaty

Q: What do you consider the highlight of your career?

A: Performing with Bo Diddly, Klaus Mein, Metallica, Gary Rossington, Pepper Keenan Sean Kinney Jerry Cantrell John Popper Jason Newstead, singing Misfits songs with Metallica live during our tour with them and GNR.

2. Eric Land
Q: You are an influence to many younger guitarists today, but who were your biggest influences and what do you remember about how those people helped to craft your sound and play style?

A: My influences to a greater extent were Jimmy Page, Jimi Hendrix, and David Gilmore. Mostly Page. His method of using a pick and his fingers at the same time and his way of squeezing the humanity out of a guitar. It’s funny how influences work. My influences were influenced by old blues men. Those legendary blues men were influenced by their tribal ancestors. The tribal ancestors are the link back to the beginning; they are the keepers of the essence. Through my influences I am connected to the roots of time and the music that elevates the primordial spirit of mankind. We do not truly compose anything genuinely new, the listeners and the presentation are what is new, and it is the perspective that varies. The ability of expression and improvisation, the stuff of creation that fascinates all life.

3. Grant
Q: It was great seeing you play again during the Metallica event…also some very great words spoken about Cliff….it was great to see ya!
Weird question, Big Jim…and I only just thought of it while scrolling through the last post on FNM Blog: What was the deal with you being the only clothed FNM member in the infamous “FNM underwear poster”? Did you just think the photo idea was dumb, or did you think it’d be better/funnier with one dude dressed to the nines in jeans, leather vest, etc. while everyone else was near nekkid.

Thanks for doing this Q&A, man! Excited to see the responses!

A: I remember it was one of the first big photo shoots for us set up by London Records. Ross Halfin, “Famous Rock Photographer”, was pretty aggressive, barking orders and abusing band members, particularly Puffy. He ordered everyone to strip down. I said “forget it” (I thought it was dumb). The other guys did, he snapped the picture and at that moment, I understood why he was famous…
4. Anonymous
Q: I’m a crazy obsessed fan and have listened to just about all the bootlegs and read all the interviews…Despite “not being into” the music on Angel Dust (so it is written in places), you played flawlessly all of 92-93 and I even caught you banging your head enthusiastically during the Phoenix Festival. Also, while others were bad-mouthing you, you always played it off with a joke and came off as the bigger person (you were hilarious in the Maida Vale interviews!)…somethiing doesn’t add up. Were you really that unhappy? If so, how do you keep such a cool head and stay so professional?

A: Thank you for the great compliment.

My publicized “not being into” Angel Dust was all about the way the whole process went down. There was a lot of weird pressure to follow up The Real Thing, and as a consequence, the album AD was more contrived musically than I thought was necessary. I wanted more of the record to happen in the studio and Bill wanted every last tack nailed down before we went in. I wanted to spend time with it, management and the record company wanted to rush it out the door. There were a bunch of journalists in the studio. We were paying for a bunch of sampling that we could have created. Matt Wallace was calling me on the phone complaining about Mike Patton’s performance. Management and record company were calling me complaining about Mike Patton’s performance and desire for outside projects.

The record company president came in the studio and said: “I hope nobody bought houses” All the air got sucked out of the room. That was one of those great moments when reality slaps you in the face. Some of my associates (had) bought houses. The pressure was on, and everyone wanted to be in the studio with me while I recorded, endlessly tinkering and fucking with me and fucking with Matt, and Matt is a really fucking wound up guy already. Prior to AD, I would work alone with Matt and his assistant engineer period. I had to kick everyone out and even though it was not a new concept it really pissed everyone off.

Live performances were always very strong. From my perspective, we came across a lot heavier than the records. Over time, the chord progressions and the arrangements would morph in subtle ways that would make the set heavier than the studio version. As far as the bullshit in the press, yeah, there was a lot of negativity, and I tried to avoid being part of it to the point of refusing interviews. Of course I was unhappy; individuals were making decisions which would prove to be damaging to FNM. However, despite these distractions, real people paid to see a show and we were able to deliver thanks to the support of a great crew and a great sound man, Greg Bess, who was used to working with the heavy bands. I actually really enjoyed those shows.

5. Anonymous
Q: If you could collaborate for a single cover song with any musician, dead or alive, who would that be and what would the song be?

A: I sure miss Cliff. Cliff Burton. We could do any song and twist it up horribly. I think if there were an opportunity to collaborate, we would write something new. Put Dave (Donato – Agents of Misfortune) in there on the drum kit and create something Cliff’s mother would call “Fucked Up Weirdos”.

6. Matt Slavsky
A: I’ll get this one out…what is your relationship like now with the members of Faith No more?

Q: To be honest Matt, that is an emotional subject. There has been much negative rhetoric in the press, and it was my choice to either play their game, fight with them and let the press spin it, or leave them to play with themselves and allow you to make a decision based on the work I left behind. In an effort to avoid the negativity, I chose the latter. However, there are some points that I would like to address.

I read a couple of interviews Matt Wallace did, and his simplified explanations can lead one to believe that I hate homosexuals, I did not contribute to Angel Dust, and I did not play guitar on the record. Ouch. Something else is a little more accurate. The guitar parts are mine; that’s me playing guitar on all the tracks. I contributed much to the songwriting and arrangements. Bill added some fluff to “Midlife Crisis” and “Midnite Cowboy” and wrote everything for his song “Small Victory”, Mike wrote everything for “Malpractice”, I wrote everything and created the samples for “Jizzlobber” ; Bill contributed the keyboard outro. Mike wrote all of the lyrics for the album except Roddy wrote lyrics for “Be Aggressive”.

Matt’s commentary about Roddy seemed a little weird; we (band members) all knew Roddy was gay long before he “came out” and it was not an issue for anyone.

Matt also forgot to mention that he and I spent a lot of time together on the production of TRT and AD improving the recording method and sonic profile in the studio. I insisted on the co-producer credit for FNM on those 2 records because of that work. Notice The Real Thing and Angel Dust are the only two FNM records co-produced by Matt Wallace and Faith No More.

I saw something in Wiki where someone pulled a comment out of an old bucket: Jim Martin said “I don’t know why It’s called Angel Dust, I had nothing to do with it” While that is true, it is not complete. The idea was Roddy’s, and nobody else had anything to do with it either.  He came in with a basic concept of a bird front, meat locker back, and Angel Dust for the title. The question was: “How do we get it (Roddy’s idea) to the record cover?” We lost control of the sleeve art on the last 2 releases. The Real Thing and Introduce Yourself were conceived and designed by “the record company” and we simply paid the bill. This was an opportunity of artistic expression and finally one of us had an idea everyone would go along with. I got in contact with Mark Leialoha to discuss the idea, he got Werner “Vern” Krutein involved because Werner ran a stock agency and was able to produce the necessary photographs allowing us to realize Roddy’s idea. I had the idea of the Russian army in the sleeve, inspired by The Pogues album “Rum Sodomy and The Lash” which I was really into at the time. I rode hard on that and made sure it happened the way WE wanted it to happen. There was a lot of squealing when it came time to pay the bill, but at the end of the day, we retained control of our resources, we were able to use our people, and we maintained creative control.

7. Matt Thompson
Q: Jim! With your publicized dislike of the content/direction of Angel Dust – are you surprised by how, 20 years on, it is widely regarded as one of the most influential ‘metal’ albums of the past 30 years?

A: Thanks for the opportunity Matt.

As for my like or dislike of AD I touched on that a little, so please refer to question 4 above.

I am happy AD is regarded in a positive way. It is an affirmation of the legacy we all worked to create. I am aware that some of the newer bands I actually like have referred to FNM as an influence. I am also aware AD was on the Kerrang! Most influential albums List of 2003. Is it an artist’s affirmation? That’s fine. Am I surprised? I don’t think anyone can be expected to anticipate something like this.

8. Otto Will Hashmi
Q: What kind of music are you listening to today? Is there anything that we might not generally expect that you like to listen to?

A: I’ve been listening to Machine Head, a great metal band out of Oakland CA. I enjoy classic jazz, reminds me of weird times as a kid. I like the “Glorious lethal euphoria” of The Mermen It’s crazy hardcore psychedelic surf music and hits the mark hard. I’ll listen to any improv, at least for a few minutes.

9. Follow The Bubbles
Q: Is it true that you were offered to perform at reunion tour dates – if it is true why did you decline? Fans would have been so happy to see on stage too! 

A: Thanks Bubbles.

For some time during 2008, I had been receiving information with increasing frequency that “we” were booking a reunion tour, festivals, Europe. I was informed that yes, the promoters were selling it as the original line up. In February 2009, Roddy called and said they were just beginning to think of putting something together, and just now feeling out everyone, and what did I think? I said yes, I was interested. I also told him I knew the tour was already booked, they were on the eve of announcing it, and it was time to sign the deals. I told him to send over the contracts so I could review them and started pressing management for details. Several days later, I was able to get management on the phone who told me they decided to use someone else…I know it’s odd, no, you didn’t miss anything. It happened just like that. In an effort to preclude any sloppy misinformation, I made the announcement that I would not be participating in the rumored reunion dates several days before they made their announcement.

10. Sean Kehoe
Q: If Faith No More tours again and if they asked would you make an appearance, kind of like when Chuck did a couple of songs? Would love to watch you perform songs like Malpractice or Jizzlobber would be awesome!

A: Thanks Sean. I know the fans want the real thing, and I was prepared to have a real dialogue about doing a run together. Unfortunately, it didn’t happen. As for a random appearance, I do not feel that would do anyone justice.

11. Jon Hanusa
Q: If you could use Bill and Ted’s phone booth to go back in time to the Angel Dust era, would you do anything differently to make sure you and FNM were heading in the same direction? If so, what?

A: Number one thing: limit journalist access and impose more control over the interviews. Almost anyone could get an interview at that time. It was a free for all, and it hurt us.

12. David Barajas
Q: Have you been jamming with anyone lately, and do you have any plans to make more music?

A: No, I’m not working with anyone right now but I do have plans to publish more music. I released a record some time ago called “Milk and Blood” go to rotgrub.com and email the webmaster for details.
13.Andrew Dunn
Q: What do you think of the music FNM have created post you? And how do you feel when you see other guitarists belting out you licks?

A: I remember hearing some of the music a long time ago but I didn’t really study it. I remember thinking it was heavily reliant on Mike. As for other persons playing my music, I don’t really believe anyone could book a show as FNM without playing my music.
14. Bob Anderson
Q: Being one of the best shredders of your era/generation, and having rubbed shoulders with some awesome musicians in your time, have you never considered forming your own little “supergroup” to set the music word to rights!!??

A: Most of my associates have families and projects taking up their time, and I’m very consumed with the things I am doing. I hope I can get to a place where I’ll be able to do something pretty soon. There are no specific plans at this time. Thanks for a great compliment.
15. Mark Rayburn
Q: Hey Jim, thanks a bunch for doin this. So where did you get the moniker “big sick ugly” from and did you like it??

A: It was bestowed upon me by the filthy press. I am pretty sure Geoff Barton gets the credit. Steffan “Cheese Burger” Chirazi, “Krusher Joule” and Neil “Greasy Chester” Perry helped magnify and perpetuate it and it was Kerrang!, once again, who rolled that one out there. Thanks to them for some funny times.